Ultimate Guide to Osaka Castle: 12

The 1st, 6th and Taiko turrets to Nishinomaru Garden

By Takako Sakamoto    - 3 min read

This photo story is to guide you step-by-step as you explore the Osaka Castle and the Osaka Castle Park. The twelfth leg of the journey begins at the Ichiban (first) Turret to the Rokuban (sixth) Turret, then to the sites of the Minami Shikirimon Gate and the Taiko (drum) Turret. These two turrets (the first and the sixth) are the only turrets remaining out of seven turrets built in 1628 and they are designated as important cultural properties. Also, there is the Nishinomaru Garden to see and enjoy here, but unfortunately when I visited it was closed for maintenance. Maybe next time! For further guidance, please refer to the links below.

Ultimate Guide to Osaka Castle Series
01: From JR Osaka St. to East Outer Moat of Osaka Castle
02: From East Outer Moat to Gokurakubashi of Osaka Castle
03: From Gokurakubashi to the last place of Hideyori & Yodo
04: Marked Stones Square and the bullet marks from WWII
05: Yamazato-maru Bailey to Hidden Bailey
06: Shikiri-mon Gate to Main Tower of Osaka Castle
07: Storehouse for gold and Time Capsule
08: Main Tower, Kimmeisui Well Roof and Noon Marker
09: Historical Display in the Main Tower of Osaka Castle
10: Japanese Garden in front of Main Tower of Osaka Castle
11. Sakura-mon Gate, huge stones, well curb and Empty Moat
12: The 1st, 6th and Taiko turrets to Nishinomaru Garden
13: Sengan turret through Otemon Gate to South Outer Moat

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Takako Sakamoto

Takako Sakamoto @takako.sakamoto

I was born in and grew up in Tokushima prefecture, and have lived in many places since then: Nishinomiya, Kyoto, Nara, Mie, Tokyo, Kanagawa, Saitama, Chiba, Fukuoka and Fukui. I am currently living in Yokohama City. All the places I lived, all the places I visited, I have loved dearly. The historical places where people lived, loved, suffered, and fought - places where I can still hear their heartbeats - mesmerize me. I'd like to retrace the footsteps of the people who lived in Japan a long long time ago, and introduce to you what they left behind on this soil.