Overview

A tiny city along the northwestern edge of central Tokyo, Kiyose City is nationally famous for Tokyo's largest annual sunflower festival, a wonderfully modern folk museum, and the remains of an Edo period cult that worshipped Mt. Fuji.

Enpukuji Temple

While the three-storied pagoda is the star of this temple, Enpukiji Temple is home to numerous little details that bring this local temple to life including a most robust nio guardian statue, some interestingly set up stone landscaping and a wonderfully creative calligraphic entrance stone.

Twelve minutes from the North Exit of Akitsu Station on the Seibu-Ikebukuro Line.

Kiyose Sunflower Festival

Located in the garden farms of Shimokyoto, the annual Kiyose Sunflower Festival is a brilliant explosion of floral sunbeams. The biggest festival of its kind in Tokyo, over 100,000 sunflowers in full bloom draws thousands of visitors over the week-long event.

Six minutes from Greentown Kyoto bus stop via the Seibu Bus from the North Exit of Kiyose Station on the Seibu-Ikebukuro Line.

Kiyose City Folk Museum

Opened in 1985 with the idea of interactive learning, the free Kiyose City Folk Museum features numerous hands-on workshop experiences. The award winning building is also home to hundreds of uchiori hand-weaved items of clothing that have been designated as important tangible folk-cultural properties of the city.

Ten minutes from the North Exit of Kiyose Station on the Seibu-Ikebukuro Line.

Fujizuka Mound at Nakazato

Part of a Mt. Fuji cult from the Edo period, Fujizuka Mound at Nakazato is a 9-metre tall replica of the famous mountain. Fujizuka mounds were used by worshippers who couldn't make the pilgrimage to the actual Mt. Fuji. This one is made from red clay and features a walking trail to its summit.

Twenty minutes from the North Exit of Kiyose Station on the Seibu-Ikebukuro Line.