Making Sushi Rolls in Kanaya Bay

FUTOMAKIZUSHI, a local dish from Chiba Prefecture

By Kotaro Toda    - 2 min read

Perhaps the hardest part about Kanaya's traditional sushi rolls is done by the people at the restaurant who have to prepare the sushi rice, food coloring, dried gourds, egg rolls and seaweed. However, even for those who make the sushi, it is far from straightforward. Fortunately, there is a teacher at hand to show how to make the sushi so that customers can try by themselves. For those who get it right, the finished sushi roll should look like a flower petal.

Although some people may not quite get it right, either way, making this sushi is a good experience for both adults and children and presents a good opportunity for others to have a laugh while enjoying themselves. Fortunately, the most difficult part, the preparation has already been done by the restaurant's staff and there is always a teacher on hand to give guidance to anyone needing help.

I really enjoyed making these sushi rolls because it felt like I was using parts of my brain which I cannot use when working at my office in Tokyo. In some ways, this experience is very similar to drawing and making clay sculptures with respect to stimulating the creative parts of your brain that we don't use in our everyday life. However, making these sushi rolls has the added bonus of allowing us to taste and enjoy the final product.

The price for one person is 1,320 yen and classes are limited to a maximum of four people. Please book at least five days in advance because the restaurant's staff need to prepare the food and materials.

Getting there

The restaurant is located in Kanaya Bay, in Kyonan, Chiba Prefecture. This is where the Ferry arrives from Kurihama, Yokosuka City, Kanagawa Prefecture which is situated on the opposite side of Tokyo Bay

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Kotaro Toda

Kotaro Toda @kotaro.toda

Kotaro has more than 10 years of experience with the American Music TV Station Group in London, Singapore, and Hong Kong. He has contributed to magazines such as SevenSeas, Esquire (Japan), Marie Claire (Japan), and Keizaikai. He is also the author of On The Road In Europe, a book chosen by Hajime Banno, CEO of Bose Japan, as one of the "greatest three books in my life" for the Bungeishunju Book Club in 2015.

Join the discussion

Kim a month ago
I like how you mentioned that you felt like you were using different parts of your brain doing this class. I think that's such a great thing!
Elena Lisina a month ago
I'd like to attend this class - some day! I read about another, similar one, also in Chiba, but in the town.