Popin’ Cookin Candy Kits by Kracie

DIY: Looks like the real thing but it’s candy!

By Jessica A Paje    - 3 min read

The Do-It-Yourself candy kits made by Kracie are so clever and ridiculously awesome. They make fantastic stocking stuffers at Christmastime for children of all ages. Parents would even get a kick out of them, if I may say so myself. The kits can be a great learning activity and a reward within itself. My favorite of them all is the Popin’ Cookin Sushi kit. As the sushi ingredients are prepped, you can smell the aroma of grape, strawberry, and orange. It’s like magic! Once the various powders are mixed with water, the colors are so vibrant and produce shapes and designs that look so realistic.

Here is a guide on how to make candy sushi from the kit as directions are printed in Japanese. You can also watch the step-by-step video here!

Notes: 1) Save all packaging: box, plastic wrap, tray, etc. 2) Additional things you will need: 1-cup of water, scissors, and a clean workspace.

Step 1 – Make Sushi Rice:

Refer to Section 1 on the white tray. Using the dropper, add water into the oval section until it reaches the line. Add contents of large, blue packet. Using the spatula, stir, chop, and mix until rice is made to your satisfaction.

Step 2 & 3 – Make Tamago (Egg omelet) and Tuna:

Refer to the two, rectangular shaped sections in the center of the tray. Take note of the designs. Using the dropper, add water into both sections until it reaches the water line. Add the yellow packet to left side. Add the pink packet to the right side. Let gelatin set for a few minutes.

Step 4 – Nori (Seaweed):

Refer to the single black piece of candy. Using the size guide on the plastic wrap, stretch and press it out until it has the same dimensions. Save for later use.

Step 5 – Salmon Roe:

Refer to sections A & B of the tray. Fill ‘A’ with water until it reaches the line. Pour small, blue packet into ‘A’ and stir. Fill ‘B’ to its water line. Pour orange contents and stir until smooth. Using the dropper, suction contents of ‘B’, and then squeeze droplets into ‘A.’

Step 6 - Make Sushi!

Using the instructional guide on the box, you can now begin to form contents into Nigiri Sushi and Ikura no Gunkanmaki. If you so desire, make the soy sauce using the upper section of the tray by adding water to the appropriate line and then add the brown packet. Enjoy the gummy sushi candies!

A variety of Gracie candy kits can be found at Don Quijote stores throughout Japan. These particular ones were purchased at Don Quijote Yokosuka, except for the sushi kit, which I bought from a small gift shop called Okashi Greenport at Narita International Airport, Terminal 2, 4F. Kits are approximately 5.75in x 1.75in x 5in and can easily fit into your carry-on baggage. 

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Jessica A Paje

Jessica A Paje @jessica.paje

Originally from San Diego, California, I lived in Japan for 4-1/2 years and now I am currently based out of Honolulu, Hawaii. In December 2010, I arrived in Yokosuka with a new outlook on my future. Mainly, to refocus on family and let my curiosities take us to places we’ve only dreamt of. Along the way, we’d hopefully develop new friendships and simply collect memories to last a lifetime. Then, there was the Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. I will never forget that experience and the devastating effects it had on the entire country. I asked the community, “What can I do to help?” Collecting, sorting, and packing donations, was the least I could do. I also ended up going back to California for one month, raised a small monetary donation for Red Cross, and secured a few phone interviews to help spread the word on how others from the United States could assist. I was determined to show my family, friends, and folks across the world that it would be okay to return to Japan. After all, I wanted them to know that all of the little things that make up this beautiful country still existed. What better way than to use a platform such as JapanTravel.com to share photos and stories full of life, history, and culture. It is a pleasure to say I have contributed more than 150 articles to a database that now collectively holds more than 15,000! This journey has not only allowed me to realize my initial goals, but I’d like to think that it has somehow played a role in sparking an interest locally and across the globe for others to experience all that is published here and more. I invite you to also share your wonderful stories, offer comments, and ask questions right here on JapanTravel. Feel free to contact me at jessica.paje@japantravel.com. Safe travels! ٩( ๑╹ ꇴ╹)۶

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