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5 Springtime Flowers Other Than Sakura in Japan

Because there's more to the season than cherry blossoms!

While cherry blossoms may be the most famous flower associated with spring in Japan, there are many other beautiful blooms that are equally worth seeing. Here are just a few of the other flowers you can enjoy during springtime in Japan.

Azaleas

Azaleas are a common sight throughout Japan during spring, and their bright pink and red hues are a stunning contrast against the greenery of parks and gardens. Nezu Shrine in central Tokyo is particularly famous for its azalea festival which typically takes place in April, or further out, Shiofune Kannon is also a gem for these flowers.

Photo: Hideya HAMANO / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Wisteria

Wisteria is another flower that blooms in Japan during spring, with cascading vines of purple flowers hanging from arbors and trellises. The Ashikaga Flower Park in Tochigi Prefecture is one of the best places to see wisteria in Japan, with tunnels and trellises covered in the delicate blooms.

Photo: Eddie Chang / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Nemophila

Also known as baby blue eyes, nemophila is a small, delicate flower that carpets fields and hillsides with a sea of blue during springtime. Hitachi Seaside Park in Ibaraki Prefecture is famous for its hillside covered with nemophila, and they're typically in full bloom from late April to early May.

Photo: Miyuki Meinaka / CC BY-SA 4.0

Tulips

While tulips may be more commonly associated with the Netherlands, Japan also has its fair share of tulip gardens that are worth visiting during spring. The Tonami Tulip Fair in Toyama Prefecture is one such destination, with over 2.5 million tulips of various colors and varieties on display.

Photo: Anton Diaz / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

Peonies

Peonies are a symbol of wealth and honor in Japan, and their large, showy blooms make them a popular flower for gardens and parks. Yuushien in Shimane is one beautiful place where travelers can enjoy them – the garden hosts an incredible peony event in late spring each year.

Photo: Shauntoniqua Clayton / JT
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