Adachi Historical Museum

Local knowledge and local learning

By Sleiman Azizi    - 2 min read

You won't have to go very far to find a local history museum somewhere in Tokyo. Gentle on the budget, though usually light on English information, local history museums are some of the least heralded sightseeing destinations in the country.

Adachi City's own local history museum, the aptly named Adachi Historical Museum, opened in the mid-1980s and is located right by the lovely Higashi-Fuchie Garden. Featuring a series of dedicated spaces over its two floors that centre upon on the development of Adachi City within the theme of Edo Tokyo's eastern suburbs, the museum makes for a pleasant way to spend some local time in Adachi City.

The museum's permanent collection features the beginnings of the present day Adachi City, tracing its evolution from the eastern suburbs of Tokyo when it was known as Edo. The First Exhibition Room looks at the relationship between Edo Tokyo and its agricultural community. Numerous exhibits are on display here, including one very curious exhibit that could only be termed an old Edo outhouse, its contents vital in the world of farming...

A Kids Hall with various easy to understand displays also features here. The hall includes a series of discovery drawers and adventure boxes in which displays are hidden and are only revealed once opened. The Second Exhibition Room focuses on modern Adachi City and includes life-sized examples of metropolitan living as it was several decades ago while on the second floor there is a gallery looking at the modern development of Tokyo's eastern suburbs with images of culture and industry.

As one would expect from a Japanese history museum for the locals, there is little English to be had here. Of course, this makes the museum a proper cultural experience with, unlike more brand-name destinations, a much more peaceful atmosphere.

Getting there

Take the Chiyoda Line to Ayase Station. From the West Exit, take the Tobu Bus bound for Mutsugi-Toju and get off at Higashi Fuchie-en bus stop.

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Sleiman Azizi

Sleiman Azizi @sleiman.azizi

A Japanese Permanent Resident, I drool over proper soba and sushi while Japanese aesthetics ticks all the right boxes for me.With over 100 published articles on Japan as well as 5 English language books written in a traditional Japanese style, I also happen enjoy writing. Funny that...I'm also the Regional Partner for Tokyo, Japan's never ending capital, so if you've anything to say about Tokyo - or Japan in general - don't be shy and contact with me via sleiman.azizi@japantravel.com

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Kim B a week ago
I agree with Elena, often the smaller museums really allow for a nicer connection with the exhibits. And yay to less crowds - always a winner!
Sleiman Azizi Author a week ago
I agree. Less crowds mean more time to take in what you are witnessing.
Elena Lisina a week ago
I like to see old things rather than any written information, and I like smaller museums rather than huge ones! ;)
Elena Lisina a week ago
I'm looking for a perfect place for me for a week-long stay without the need to rush to see crowded places of interest. Instead, I'd like to explore one place slowly and to dine in the same place as I did in Yudanaka. Hosts of the family-run restaurant already knew me after 2 evenings. :) Also I liked my stay in Sendai for 8 days in a row.