Enoshima's Iwamoto-ro Inn

With the best view of Mt. Fuji on Enoshima Island

By Tomoko Kamishima    - 4 min read

Kanagawa’s Enoshima is a small island connected by a 600-meter bridge to the Katase shore. It is only 4 km around but one of the most popular tourist spots in the Shonan area. And no wonder—it is a really neat place! In the old days, Enoshima was famous as a pilgrimage destination. And Ukiyoe painters such as Hokusai and Hiroshige created works of beauty featuring the island that are still with us today. More recently, beginning around the time of the 1964 Tokyo Olympics, it has become a mecca for fans of marine sports. Because it is convenient to reach, most people are daytime guests. But if you stay overnight on Enoshima, you will make a wonderful discovery on this tiny island.

Fantastic Fuji view!

Iwamoto-ro (岩本楼) is a Japanese ryokan (inn) that is situated just over the bridge, on the right side of the main street, facing west. All of the guest rooms face the sea, and therefore Mt. Fuji as well, beyond the sea. It is worth visiting if only for this stunning view. When we stayed at Iwamoto-ro in mid December, the sun set at 4:30 p.m. The transition from day to night took about 30 minutes. From dusk to twilight I stuck close to the window to see the exquisite contrast of shades of color of Mt. Fuji and the orange-red sky. Although Mt. Fuji is always there, you will probably only be able to catch this breathtaking show in the winter, when the sky is crystal clear.

Dinner

After enjoying the gorgeous sunset from the window, our caretaker—a woman named Mari—brought our dinner to the room. It included a great variety of local Enoshima seafood. First, a plate of sashimi (raw fish), grilled shrimp, turban cooked in its own shell, a small bowl of salmon roe, sesame tofu, vegetables mixed with sweet vinegar, a seasonal hot-pot stew, etc. This trip was a birthday present from my husband and he mentioned it to her, so she brought us a complimentary bottle of white wine from the management. We really enjoyed the dinner.

Their Baths

Each room has its own private bath, but enjoying a dip in the inn’s big bath is pretty enjoyable. They have two types of very interesting baths. One, they call their “Roman bath”. It is decorated with stained glass and interesting ceramic tiles. You are able to feel like a king or queen in ancient Rome must have felt! The other is a bath dug into the side of the mountain, like a cave. Why don’t you explore this unknown space?! You can enjoy use of these baths 24 hours a day, whenever you want.

Free Wifi connection

Iwamoto-ro has a free Wifi service called FreeSpot. If you are a Mac device user, you can easily set up your machine for their connection. Please ask them for the key code at the reception desk. The set up method is explained at the hyperlink above.

History

Iwamoto-ro used to be called Iwamoto-in. At that time, it was an accommodation for the many shoguns and daimyos of the Edo era. At that time, the emperor was in Kyoto and the Shogun was in Edo, and people frequently went and back from Edo to Kyoto along the Tokai-do. That was not only for political reasons, but also for cultural and business exchanges. Iwamoto-in was one of the places they enjoyed visiting—they’d have a hot bath to recover from the fatigue of a long journey, and then spend the evening eating and enjoying the marvelous view of Mt. Fuji.

Reservations

For Japanese visitors, their Internet reservation system is the easiest way to make a reservation. But unfortunately, they have no English version, so please send them a FAX in English (+81-466-24-0578). Prices differ according to the season, how many meals you have and the size of the meal, as well as the size of your room. The range would be between 13,000 yen-27,000 yen per person per night.

I strongly recommend the combination trip of Kamakura and Enoshima. How about watching temples and feeling samurai history in Kamakura, and then relaxing and refreshing yourself in Enoshima!

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Tomoko Kamishima

Tomoko Kamishima @tomoko.kamishima

Japan is a small island nation, but we have a huge number of surprising things to discover here. Many of these delights can be found when you step off the main street onto small side paths. I really enjoy studying about and researching various aspects of traditional Japanese culture, and then sharing this information with visitors to Japan. I hope you will enjoy it, too! ARTICLE INDEX & PHOTOS:  An index of most of my Japan Travel articles can be found at the entry page of my blog, and my photos are shown here.  日本はとても小さな国ですが、大通りから一本小道に入ればたくさんの発見があります。日本人が積み重ねてきた歴史を学びながら、古い建物や庭を訪ね、物語の舞台となった景色を眺めて、皆様といっしょに日本文化の奥深さを探求していきたいと思います。

Join the discussion

Wouter Thielen 5 years ago
Aah, natsukashii! We went into the cave bath and while it was not really big, it was a spectacular experience!
Larry Knipfing 5 years ago
Perfect time of the year to stay at this ryokan inn with stunning views of Mt. Fuji! I stayed here two years ago and loved it!
Wouter Thielen 7 years ago
Going there in April! Hope we can enjoy the sight of Mt. Fuji too. And I am quite curious about the cave baths.
Barry Louie 7 years ago
Fantastic descriptions and imagery. I hope that those who read this article don't all say "It's our anniversary tonight," or "It's my wife's birthday." ploy. :-) I'm taking the Eno-den and going there my next visit to Kanagawa.