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Atami

Hot spring paradise

About Atami
Photo: Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com

Things to do in Atami

Upcoming Atami Events

Atami Plum Garden Plum Festival

Atami Plum Garden Plum Festival

Jan 9th - Mar 7th

The Atami Plum Garden in Shizuoka is home to some of Japan's earliest blooming plum tree varieties. The annual plum festival..

7 ¥300
Atami Castle Cherry Blossom Festival

Atami Castle Cherry Blossom Festival

Late Mar - Mid Apr

There are a myriad of cherry blossom festival during spring, and the grounds of Shizuoka's Atami Castle are home to one of the..

4 Free

Shizuoka Top 10

Where to eat in Atami

Rose Mary Cafe

Rose Mary Cafe

Peter Sidell

In the resort town of Atami in Japan's Shizuoka prefecture, Rose Mary Cafe is a stylish cafe, serving tasty, affordable food..

Places to stay in Atami

Farm Takanawa Club, Atami

Farm Takanawa Club, Atami

Featured

Farm Takanawa Club’s beautiful hotel in the hills above Atami is a great escape from Tokyo. The facilities, food and setting a..

Latest Atami Reports

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About Atami

Atami is a seaside resort town about 50 minutes away from Tokyo by shinkansen, making it a popular weekend getaway destination.

In Japan's boom days, Atami was the weekend vacation of choice, and on holidays you might still see busy streets and happy shopkeepers. Although its luster has faded, Atami is still well known for its many hot springs as well as coastal fireworks held throughout the year. Add to this an easygoing pace and nostalgic charm, Atami can be the ideal getaway from the hustle and bustle of Tokyo.

It's great to just wander around in Atami, taking in the relaxed atmosphere, but there are a few places you shouldn't miss.

Get a history lesson at Yushima Amusement Park (ゆしま遊技場) which serves up manual, antique "smart ball" pachinko, the way it was played before it became Japan's national addiction. Observant tourists will notice that not only this gaming house but many of the storefronts and buildings in Atami look straight out of Japan's boom days, the 1960s to 1980s. Modern buildings are meanwhile hard to spot-- it's as if the whole town has been stuck in time.

Before you leave, don't forget to visit the MOA Museum of Art, a quick bus ride from the station. When you go through the ticket gate and begin your seemingly endless ascent of 14 100-foot-long escalators (1/4 of a mile in total), it's easy to get an eerie inkling that this museum is connected to a religious organization. But at the top of those escalators is a jaw-dropping collection of classic Western and Eastern art that deepens one's aesthetic taste and makes for a fine beginning or ending to a pleasant weekend trip.

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